Shukan News 16th July 2012

1. Mansfield/Mt Gravatt Ladies only class

Mansfield/Mt Gravatt dojo will be running a ‘ladies only’ class on Wednesday 25th July. If you have never tried Aikido and feel uncertain or lack the confidence to start out in a mixed class then this class may be for you. As with other martial arts Aikido does require physical contact so this can be somewhat daunting for females, especially as martial arts tend to be male dominated.

Aikido is for everyone, male and female, young or old and it’s ideal for females as it is an art that relies on calm mind and relaxed body, rather than size and physical strength. We have many females train with us at Griffith Aikido of various ages and ranks, so for an effective self defence come along and give Aikido a try.

There will be a female instructor for the class too. Adults class time: 6.30 – 8.30pm

Link as follows for directions:

http://www.griffithaikido.com.au/BAC-dojo-launch-flyer-printable.pdf

2. Gozo Shioda Sensei Article

It Had to Be Felt #10: Shioda Gozo: “A Wonderful Feeling”

Here is a very interesting read on Aikiweb of two first hand experiences with Gozo Shioda Sensei, the founder of Aikido Yoshinkan and student of Morihei Ueshiba.
http://www.aikiweb.com/forums/showthread.php?t=20998

Read more

Shukan News 9th July 2012

Monday 9th July 2012

 

1. Sneak Peek at the Thursday’s training

In the 11 June edition of Shukan news we featured some spectacular vision of
Aikido master Christian Tissier. Mike Nash will be exploring some aspects of
Tissier’s style at this Thursday night’s training. Please review this video in
preparation for Thursday’s class. Mike will go into the finer points and explore
this version and our own version of Kokyu Nage. Yes, it’s a first homework….
for Aikido

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHi-iRmx-dQ

Also for those who attended training last thursday it appears that Steve
Mitchell Sensei may have been channelling Tissier. Look about half way through
the below vision of Tissier where he demonstrates some of the shoman techniques

2. Mansfield/Mt Gravatt Dojo

A reminder to all that both kids and adult classes recommence this Wednesday,
11th July. We look forward to seeing our regulars and anyone new who wants to
come and join us!

3. Thought for the week

“Learn from the mistakes of others. You can’t live long enough to make them
all yourself” Eleanor Roosevelt

Shukan News 2nd July 2012

1. Mansfield/Mt Gravatt dojo cancelled class

We apologise again for the sudden cancellation of the Mansfield/Mt Gravatt kids and new womens class last Wednesday. Circumstances beyond our control, and of which we were only informed upon getting to the dojo just prior to class caused the inability for classes to be held. Energex were putting in a new transformer on Broadwater Road resulting in loss of power to to all primary school buildings including the daycare and Student Centre at Brisbane Adventist College. The college have apologised for miscommunication which resulted in us not being advised of this work and the subsequent loss of use of the Student Centre.

Classes at Mansfield/Mt Gravatt are not on this week either, but will resume as normal with both kids and adults classes on 11th July 2012.

2. Next Beginners Course

Read more

Shukan News 27th June

Beginners course starts Tuesday 3rd July – all welcome!

1. CANCELLED Ladies night tonight at Mansfield-Mt Gravatt dojo

The ladies only class to be held tonight (6.30 pm Wednesday 27 th June) at Mansfield – Mt Gravatt dojo has been cancelled due to a power outage at the Adventist College.  We apologise for the inconvenience.  Classes will resume as normal not next week, but the week after (when school returns).

http://www.griffithaikido.com.au/BAC-dojo-launch-flyer-printable.pdf

2. On leadership and loyalty

In our beloved art of Aikido, there is so much written and said about the loyalty of a student to both the instructor and the dojo.  In fact, the 7th element of the Samurai code of Bushido is about loyalty.  That student loyalty is absolutely critical to the proper functioning of a dojo is not in doubt.

What about the loyalty of an instructor to his students and dojo?  Isn’t that equally important?  Is an instructor not also a student?   Doesn’t the 7th and overriding element of Bushido still apply?

Read more

Shukan News 18th June

1. Mansfield-Mt Gravatt dojo wants you

Steve-MitchellIf you didn’t know, Mansfield-Mt Gravatt Dojo is now running children’s and adult’s classes on Wednesdays. Two kids classes run from 4pm to 6pm. Adult classes run from 6.30pm to 8.30pm. Children’s classes have been steadily building since beginning in April, with a very handy word-of-mouth advertising having great effect. Both classes currently have about 10 kids each, and will continue to grow.

Adults classes started this month. We haven’t quite had a chance to do traditional advertising so classes are still small. The members who have come have received some very individual and focussed training. If you’ve thought about trying training on Wednesday night, or you have to miss Tuesday or Thursday night training for some reason, or you just want to check out the club’s new dojo, you are absolutely welcome. It’s not hard to find.

Read more

Shukan News 11th June

Looking for martial arts Brisbane? Learn aikido at Griffith Aikido

If you have any contribution for the Shukan News (story, photograph, video), please send it via email to gary@garyweigh.com

1. First class at Mansfield – A Student’s Perspective

It was great to have the adult classes finally kick off at Mansfield/Mt Gravatt dojo.   Classes were a little small – 2 newbies but made for great sensei to student ratio!  A huge thank you to Mike Nash for assisting our kids classes guru Steve, who headed up the class.  It was interesting from a newbie point of view as both guys have their slightly different approach to things which meant getting taught the same techniques, with slightly different twists on it.

That’s the reality I guess, every person will always teach something a little differently.  It showed me that getting too caught up in the technique itself, which I tend to focus on, isn’t as important as getting the underlying ‘feel’ of the movement itself.  My beginner’s course was a quest for getting each technique perfect, instead of being able to feel each movement and in turn get it right by default.  Now in attending regular classes, its no longer about perfection for me.

With a fair bit of encouragement from Steve, I took my focus off getting the technique perfect from the start and instead felt for elements like balance and moving of my ‘centre’.  I got a lot from the class and can’t wait until next Wednesday – thanks again Steve and Mike!

Read more

Shukan News 4th June

Beginners course starts Tuesday 5th June – all welcome!

If you have any contribution for the Shukan News (story, photograph, video), please send it via email to gary@garyweigh.com

1. Adults Classes Now At Mansfield-Mt Gravatt Dojo from Wednesday 6th June

Brisbane-aikido-mansfield-dojoWe have now locked down class times for the kids classes, which allows us to lock down a time for the adults class (see below). The mats the club ordered to allow the Mansfield-Mt Gravatt Dojo to begin, have now arrived. Nathan now has brand new 14 metre mats and the current front mats at Nathan have now gone to Mansfield-Mt Gravatt Dojo. The 10 metre mats which have been on loan have been returned to Nathan, so Nathan now has all its mat space back. Many thanks go to Nathan Dojo for going without the back mats for several weeks to allow Mansfield-Mt Gravatt Dojo to start.

Adults classes start at Mansfield-Mt Gravatt Dojo from this Wednesday 6th June. Time will be 6.30pm – 8.30pm. Classes are included in the monthly fees currently paid at Nathan. That is, it will not cost you any extra to train at Mansfield Mt-Gravatt dojo if you pay monthly mat fees.

Read more

Shukan News 28th May

Beginners course starts Tuesday 5th June – all welcome!

If you have any contribution for the Shukan News (story, photograph, video), please send it via email to gary@garyweigh.com

1. Club grading last Saturday

It was a great day. Eleven of our members graded on Saturday. They all showed once again that there is no substitute for hard work and repetitive practice.

aikido brisbane6th Kyu

Jessica, Warwick and Catherine were wonderful. They all have a very good grasp of basic technique and showed some good footwork. There were some good early signs of Aikido understanding.

Even though Catherine was obviously very nervous before she started, she did a great job. One of the fundamentals of Aikido is relaxation. It also makes future gradings far less stressful.

Rod4th Kyu

Two of our more mature-age students, Rod and Peter have been training regularly since the day they started. Both have a wonderful attitude towards their training. Decades of upper body strength are fast disappearing from both of them. Week by week, month by month they become softer and more flowing with their technique. This was evident on Saturday as they moved much more freely. Both did a very good job with their demonstration techniques and , like most older blokes, were never in a rush.

Brenden3rd Kyu

With the mat to himself, Brenden was the centre of attention for his green belt demonstration. He was calm, cool and relaxed and his technique was soft and flowing. He didn’t rush and was in control from start to finish.

Brenden travels from Gatton every Saturday to train with us. he has done a remarkable job. Well done Brenden, welcome to the senior grades.

Bartek1st Kyu

The future of our cub is looking as though it is in capable hands if these five first class hakama gradings are any indication. For Bartek, Rick, Matthew, Danny and Kylie, this was the penultimate demonstration ahead of their Shodan grading in a year’s time.

No matter how much practice is done, this grading is still a challenge on the day. Like all senior gradings, it is less of an instructor-set test and more a test of the self. These five club stalwarts all worked very hard to get here, and all are great examples for those coming behind them.

Matthew21Every one of these dedicated students has had their own personal challenge to deal with. To their credit they all met their individual challenges and passed their own tests with flying colours. This was exemplified by the look of complete and utter relief on Kylie’s face as she knelt to bow out of her weapons kata.

For the onlookers it was a great spectacle to watch as they calmly guided their ukes around the mat. It just never ceases to be entertaining. It is also wonderful for instructors to see students emerge into the realm of calm effortless and confident Aikido.

It is just as gratifying to see the same students rolling effortlessly as Ukes, knowing they have skills for life that will stand them in good stead outside the dojo.

Congratulations to our five new 1st kyu students who will go on to meet their next challenge on Tuesday night of standing, moving and rolling in their new hakama. I wouldn’t miss that test.

Rick3   Kylie2-300x285   Matthew   Rick4   Danny   Danny3

Thank you to all the other seniors who have helped out in recent weeks as assistant instructors and ukes as all 11 students prepared for their grading.

2. Modern Aikido: Moves and Meaning

Here is an interesting article called ‘Modern Aikido: Moves and Meaning’, authored by Tom Koch and published on the Black Belt Magazine website.

http://www.blackbeltmag.com

Ueshiba_aikido2“Forget the politics that have divided the founder Morihei Ueshiba’s aikido into a half-dozen communities, all calling themselves aikido. There are, in truth, only two aikido camps today: one mostly hidden, some say forgotten, and the other ascendant.

The first is a fearsome martial art cobbled together from older Japanese styles, resulting in a pattern of off-balancing entries, devastating throws and effective joint locks. That was the system Morihei Ueshiba, also known as O-Sensei, used in 70 matches when adepts from other styles came by to ask for a “lesson.”

The second is a noncombat-related practice in which aikido moves are taught to advance Morihei Ueshiba’s social philosophy, one in which effectiveness is at best secondary to goals of personal balance and communal harmony. That is hombu aikido today, the discipline that’s advanced by the founder’s grandson, Moriteru Ueshiba, the current head, or doshu, of the style. That doesn’t mean the aikido moves he teaches are ineffective, only that martial excellence is, for him, a secondary concern.” …

Click here to read the entire article on the Black Belt magazine website.

http://www.blackbeltmag.com/daily/traditional-martial-arts-training/aikido/modern-aikido-moves-and-meaningpart-1/

3. Thought for the week

“If you can dream it, you can do it.” Walt Disney

Griffith Aikido Brisbane Shukan News 21st May

Griffith Aikido Brisbane – now at Nathan, Everton Hills & Mansfield

1. Grading at Nathan dojo Saturday 26th May

please-noteAll of that hard practice over recent weeks will be on show next Saturday at the Griffith Aikido grading day. Held at Nathan dojo, there will be a variety of coloured belt gradings plus several 1st kyu demonstrations. If you want to see Aikido in action come along next Saturday. Adult gradings start at the usual class time of 10.30am. Members please bring a plate to contribute to the post grading celebration. If you are unsure what to bring, please ask Narelle at the front desk.

2. Aikido is more than physical technique

Technique is for the dojo. Aikido is for life!

Maruyama-Sensei-Goshinkan-2011

Courtesy Spiral Photography

Whilst technique is important, there is so much more to Aikido than being able to throw or immobilize. For example, Jim Nicholls Sensei from Byron Bay Aikido club gives a wonderful lesson in verbal Aikido. There is no physical contact involved. The only obvious links between defender and aggressor are voice and body language. It is a subtle (and sometimes not so subtle) combination of tone, volume, expression and posture.

Of course, voice and body language are merely the outer forms. The inner form is the spirit. In other words, what is really driving the voice and the body’s posture as a self defense mechanism is a positive mind, self confidence and a strong extension of internal energy. Although invisible, there is a real connection made at this level.

As O Sensei said, “Your spirit is the true shield.”

Verbal Aikido employs all the same principles of Aikido but without the physical contact. This is very relevant to everyday life because not every action in this world requires a martial response. In fact very little does. Outside the dojo, we always have a choice of how we respond to people. For example, using Aikido terminology, we can choose:

Irimi or tenkan – enter or turn? Atemi or taijin – strike or retreat?

The threats we deal with on a daily basis are statistically unlikely to come in the form of an armed attack or random violence. They are most likely to come in the form of frustration and anger arising from skirmishes at home, at work, out shopping, and while driving.

So while it is technique that is learnt inside the dojo, it is the underlying principles that are applied outside. Most of the time, these must be applied without any physical contact whatsoever.

3. Sanja Festival this weekend in Tokyo

959Sanja Matsuri (literally “Three Shrine Festival”), or Sanja Festival, is one of the three great Shinto festivals in Tokyo, along with the Kanda Matsuri and Sannō Matsuri. It is considered one of the wildest and largest. The festival is held in honor of Hinokuma Hamanari, Hinokuma Takenari and Hajino Nakatomo, the three men who established and founded Sensō-ji, an ancient Buddhist temple located in Asakusa, Taitō, Tokyo. Ity is Tokyo’s oldest temple.

Sanja Matsuri is held on the third weekend of every May at Asakusa Shrine. Its prominent parades revolve around three mikoshi (three portable shrines referenced in the festival’s name), as well as traditional music and dancing. Over the course of three days, the festival attracts 1.5 to 2 million locals and tourists every year.

people104Like many Japanese festivals, Sanja Matsuri is a religious celebration. It is a weekend-long Shinto festival that is dedicated to the kami (spirits) of three men. It is believed that two fishermen—brothers named Hinokuma Hamanari and Hinokuma Takenari—found a statuette of the Bodhisattva Kannon caught in a fishing net in the Sumida River on May 17, 628. The third man, a wealthy landlord named Hajino Nakatomo, heard about the discovery, approached the brothers and converted them to Buddhism. The three men then devoted their lives to the Buddhist faith and consecrated the statue in a small temple. This temple, now known as the Sensō-ji, currently houses the Kannon statue and is the oldest temple in Tokyo.

The Sanja Matsuri appears to have many forms that date back as early as the 7th century, as well as several names such as “Kannon Matsuri” and “Asakusa Matsuri”. Sanja Matsuri’s present day form was established during the Edo Period. In 1649, shogunate Tokugawa Iemitsu commissioned the construction of Asakusa Shrine, a Shinto shrine dedicated to the three kami. The existence of this shrine helped to solidify the festival’s importance as well as its current structure and organization

Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanja_Matsuri

4. Thought for the week

“Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.” Winston Churchill

Shukan News 14th May

Murray Loader seminar is this coming weekend.

If you have any contribution for the Shukan News (story, photograph, video), please send it via email to gary@garyweigh.com

1. Murray Loader seminar this weekend

SEMINAR OUTLINE

brisbane-aikidoSaturday

1st Session 11.00am – 1.00pm
Lunch 1.00 – 2.00pm
Lenore is kindly making chicken and corn soup with garlic bread, sandwiches and cupcakes. She’ll have a vegetarian option as well.

2nd Session 2.00 – 4.00pm
Saturday night dinner – 7.00pm at Broncos Leagues Club. For directions & dinner prices go to www.broncosleagues.com.au

Sunday

3rd Session 10.00am – 1.00pm

PRICES (all prices include lunch)

Members

Saturday (2 sessions) $30
Sat & Sun (all 3 sessions) $40
Adult per session $15
Child per session $5
Lunch only $5
Visitors

Sat & Sun (all 3 sessions) $50
Adult single session $20
Lunch only $5

2. Effective self defence – awareness & martial spirit

martial-arts-brisbane-2The reasons why random attacks succeed are because (a) there is often more than one assailant, and (b) the assailants rely on the element of surprise.

Being caught unaware is the real problem. It is debatable what may or may not have happened if an intended victim had prior notice of an impending attack. But with awareness comes choices, even if the choice is to avoid or run.

Awareness will keep you out of more trouble than a good working knowledge of self defence techniques. So the first priority is to develop a constant state of alertness and be capable of responding instinctively and calmly to unexpected confrontations.

However, it is not easy to train directly for the unexpected because everything that happens in the dojo is expected. In the interests of safe training everything is seen and predictable.

I am not suggesting that Aikido training is a waste of time for this reason. This same issue is faced by most civilian dojo-based martial arts. What I am suggesting is that Aikido training slowly builds martial spirit which in turn develops awareness, alertness, instinctive response and a non-fighting mindset.

I can only speak for my own training when I say that the most valuable life skill that I have developed by regular training is a calm mind and ‘martial spirit’. Aikido is a path of internal or spiritual development. It contains within it a moral obligation to respect all living beings. Accordingly, Aikido techniques embody the principle of non-resistance.

Regular practice with a sharp focus on the martial aspects of Aikido, as well as its etiquette and traditions, helps build the martial spirit. Without these disciplines, the Art would be little more than a nice night out and some healthy exercise.

aikido-brisbane-5Martial focus must be maintained when practicing techniques that have the potential to be highly dangerous. Injuries occur when concentration lapses. Martial focus also develops sensitivity to training partners of different size, build, flexibility and gender.

Concentrating on the reactions of training partners while applying a joint lock will keep them safe and increase your own sensitivity to its effectiveness in people of varying sizes and flexibility.

Group training develops awareness and alertness, particularly when 30-50 people are on the mat together. You learn to know what’s going on around you.

Aikido is an up close and personal activity which puts people, both male and female, into very close contact with each other. That in itself induces fear that makes some beginners quit early.

For this and other reasons, etiquette is also a vital ingredient to martial spirit. It provides a non-threatening model for close personal interactions. It also helps establish a controlled setting for safe dojo practice and develops respect for teachers, partners and self, as well for the ancestry and lineage of the art.

In everyday life, people who are polite and well mannered tend not to have many enemies and they are less inclined to actively seek trouble.

-Gary

3. Thought for the week

“Most people achieve their greatest success one step beyond what looked like their greatest failure.” Brian Tracy